34 Sites to Sell Your Handmade Crafts Online

While Etsy is the most popular site to show and sell your indie crafts online, simply setting up an Etsy shop for your handmade items will seldom generate enough revenue to make a full time income.  Etsy does have a wonderful community but it’s also easy for artists to get lost in the crowd on Etsy. My recommendation is to definitely list on Etsy but also pick a few of the smaller online venues where you aren’t such a small fish in the huge market. Below is a list of 26 additional sites for selling hand made crafts:

  1. ArtFire  is the second best-known indie marketplace with a great community feel to it.
  2. Artful Home This is an upscale site showcasing quality craftsmanship.  It lists handcrafted home decor as well as jewelry and apparel. I could get lost on artfulhome.com for hours.
  3. Bonanza has free listings, low fees and live support.  They do have a craft category but they also sell books, CDs and other merchandise. I would say if you have a high end product, you want to attract a more discriminating buyer.
  4. Cafe Press  A print-on-demand site. If you design an image you want to print on tee-shirts, mugs, apparel, wall posters and a wide variety of objects, you can do it here without having to purchase and stock a large volume of goods.
  5. Chictopia More of a fashion website that also features handmade clothes and accessories. They do not have a shopping cart so you must link to your own site. No listing fees.
  6. Coriandr  U.K.-based with an easy-to-set-up storefront or a mini-shop that you can embed into your own website or blog.  They have a section for gifts under £20.
  7. Craftly now re-directs to goodsmiths.com a newer startup for artists and craftspeople. There is a section where crafters can share their projects and tips. No listing fee.
  8. Crafty Magpie    At Crafty Magpie, you will only find British handmade products – no ‘sourced’ items or mass produced. We’ve recently welcomed a new seller who supplies crafty tools and accessories
  9. Dawanda  shoppers can create collections of products and share them with friends. It appears to be a well-organized and seller-friendly marketplace.
  10. Free Craft Fair  is more of a directory .
  11. Folksy  U.K handmade marketplace with patterns and tutorials in addition to crafts for sale.
  12. FoodCopia is a marketplace for artisan foods.
  13. Foodoro another marketplace for indie food producers,
  14. Handmade Artists’ Shop is a combination of marketplace and forum. I’m partial to this one because there’s a tight sense of community and the proprietors are artists themselves so they “get” you.
  15. Handmade Catalog  also started by a crafter. They charge a monthly fee and percentage of sales.
  16. iCraft  strictly handmade, no vintage or resale products and no food items.
  17. Lilly’s Craft Mall  small site started by a WAHM,
    free listing. Sellers are limited to 15 products for the first 30 days.
  18. Made It Myself  No listing fee. 3% selling fee. Clean, friendly website with a hobbyist feel.
  19. Misi  U.K. Sellers get a “free for life” shop including a subdomain. Includes a marketing, start-up support forum and low commissions on sales.
  20. Mymela  India arts and crafts. An interesting model of E-commerce and micro-finance called Integrated Micro Advance Funding. Buyers can also donate or make loans to start-up crafts people.
  21. Notmassproduced  UK and Europe. Juried so should maintain quality.
  22. PoppyTalk Handmade  a monthly online curated. Buyers are directed back to your existing marketplace site or your Etsy shop. Like Notmassproduced, because it’s curated, it should maintain high quality.
  23. Redbubble.com  US and Australia. Appears to be a fun company. All handmade.
  24. Ruby Lane  One of the original online market-places. Includes vintage and antiques as well as handmade. One time set-up fee and monthly maintenance fee.
  25. SpoonFlower  I am absolutely enamored with this site. You can design your own fabric and they print it for you.
  26. Supermarket  a curated collection of contemporary design products. Has a cosmopolitan flair.
  27. Zibbet  combination of handmade, vintage, fine art and supplies. No listing fees, no commission fees and a free level account.

 

When we talk about “handmade”, many people assume we’re referring to crafts but there are two categories of artisan-made that can be profitable and often overlooked. I’m talking about edible crafts and body products: bread, cupcakes, tapenades, flavored oils, preserves, cider, lotions, soaps, body balms, bath oils, scrubs and handcrafted hair products. Basically anything you can eat, drink or put on your body that’s made by hand rather than in a factory. We’ve talked about selling at farmer’s markets and other physical venues on 12 Ways to Bring in an Extra $1200 a Month tele-seminar.Here are some additional online resources to help makers of edible and body-care products sell their hand crafted goods. Most of these are curated or “juried” sites so you must submit a sample to be included.
farmmade.com actually has more bath and body than food and includes all craft “made on family farms”.

foodoro.com  wonderful, searchable categories

fooducopia.com yum! Just yum.

Speaking of farms, most areas have directories of farmers markets, often with maps. Michigan has http://mifma.org/find-a-farmers-market/

mouth started out as strictly New York made but has expanded to National and broken down into regions for local/handmade. They have a gift concierge and subscription “of-the-month” programs as well.

 ourfoodshed.com Portland based, it prides itself on “authentic flavor, straight from the source.

 thekitchn.com  If you sell here, you’re in good company.

 

 

This is an extensive list but there are many more such as sites that specialize in fine art or a particular medium. There are also quite a few print-on-demand sites similar to Cafe Press. I will cover some of those in a future post.

 

This list is strictly a directory and not an endorsement. I recommend you spend some time perusing each site and choose a few that feature products complimentary to those you make. I would love to hear if you’ve found other sites you’d like to share with your fellow artisans. If so, please share in the comments below.

 

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